Heathers_headshot_2
I am about to introduce one of my favorite people in the industry as an *official* stamp designer, and I couldn’t be more thrilled.  Heather Nichols is talented beyond belief and has developed her own unique style that can be recognized instantly.  It’s rustic, yet clean & simple.  Heather style is carried over into her very first stamp set for Papertrey Ink entitled Rustic Branches. With wreaths & branches that have various overlays, it is like being provided with a canvas to embellish to suit your style, color scheme or season.  I am anxious to see the many variations you will create once you get this versatile set in your hands!

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Cutting_squares
For my project today I decided to bring out a bit of fabric, muslin to be specific.  I like the earthiness of it, which I think works so well with this new set.  I wanted to create some personalized sachets as a small gift for a dear friend.  In order to make measurements an unnecessary task, I just die cut the fabric using the largest scalloped square from the Nestabilities.  I cut four  scalloped squares so that I could create  two sachets.  Muslin is one of the best choices for this type of project for it’s breathability.  The loose weave will allow the scent of the lavender I am filling them will permeate the space they reside in!

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Stamping_wreath
Next, I stamped the outline wreath image with Landscape Palette ink in the center of two of the squares.

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Monograming_sachets
The outline berry overlay was next, stamped with Lavender Moon ink.  I also added a monogram using the Ambassador Monogram Edition Alphabet in the center of the wreath.  The letters fit perfectly! 

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Marking_seam_line
I used one of the smaller standard square Nestbailities dies and a Mark-B-Gone pen to draw a seam line around the perimeter of the scalloped squares.  The Mark-B-Gone pen can be found in any sewing section, even at Wal-Mart.  It is easy to remove later on, but is vibrant enough that it is easy to use as a guide while you need it.

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Filling_sachet
I stitched three sides of the sachets with my sewing machine, backstitching at the beginning and end to prevent the thread from unraveling.  I found that you could achieve the neatest finished appearance by starting in a corner and ending in a corner. I then filled my sachet with dried lavender.  There are a variety of sources for lavender and other fillers you could use for sachets.  A great retailer of organic lavender is The Lavender Fields General Store.   Only fill the bag about halfway to allow room to add the last seam on the sewing machine.

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Stitching_sachet_closed
I  stitched the last side of the sachet to complete it. I loved how easy it was to get everything perfectly the straight by using the lines as a guide.  It worked out really well.

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Dabbing_seam_line
To eliminate the Mark-B-Gone pen lines, I just dabbed them with a moist paper towel.  They disappear like magic!   Set aside to allow to dry when you have finished this step.

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Finished_sachets
Here are the finished sachets!  I think they look like something right out of a boutique!

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Tag_closeup
As a last finishing touch, I tied the two sachets together using Lavender Moon satin ribbon.  I made a tag from Kraft cardstock using Tag Trio and stamped the “Handmade by” image from Heather’s set.  I was able to sign & date the back of the tag to make it more personal!

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Cloth_cardstock_cut
The sachets definitely could not be given by themselves, so a coordinating card was definitely in order!  I started by die cutting a piece of muslin fabric and a piece of vintage cream cardstock at the same time with a smaller scalloped square from the Nestabilities.

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Stitching_beads
I kept the two layers together and stitched around the perimeter with my sewing machine, repeating the look of the sachets.  I then stamped the same wreath & berries in the center.  As an extra touch, I stitched lavender seed beads onto each berry using a needle & thread.

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Scoring_accent
I wanted to keep my card base really simple, but yet give it a bit of character, so I got out one of my all time favorite background sets, Polka Dot Basics.  I measured the width of the particular set of dots I chose and scored two sets of lines above and below the measurement on the BACK of the front cover using my Scor-Pal

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Finished_scoring_accents
I then flipped the card over and stamped my dots in between the score lines.  Perfect!

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Rustic_thankful_card
I adhered my focal point to the center with foam dimensionals and added the “thankful” sentiment from Rustic Branches to the bottom corner.  Super simple but showcasing a few details, like I talked about in yesterday’s post.

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Rustic_thankful_ensemble
Here is the finished ensemble all together.  I love how peaceful everything looks and the soothing nature it seems to exude.  Who wouldn’t love to receive something pampering like this?  If you wanted to turn this more into a holiday gift, you could stamp the berries in red and fill the sachets with pine needles.  Inexpensive and so thoughtful!

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Creativeclicks

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For an additional peek at Rustic Branches, be sure to stop by Heather’s blog today!

Lisa has more to share with you as well using her latest set!

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Suppliestools

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Stamps: Rustic Wreath, Ambassador Monogram Edition Alphabet, Polka Dot Basics
Ink: Landscape, Lavender Moon Palette inks, vanilla pigment
Paper: Classic Kraft, Vintage Cream
Other: Lavender Moon satin ribbon, Square Nestabilities, Tag Trio, Scor-Pal, sewing machine, lavender, muslin fabric

Nichole Heady

Author Nichole Heady

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